DAMIAN D’SILVA IS trying to explain to you what bolu koku is. We’ve never heard of it, and maybe you haven’t either. Which is the whole point. The heritage chef’s greater mission is to educate Singaporeans about some of the sweeter things in life that we don’t even know exist. Such as this traditional Eurasian cake that is said to be the precursor of kueh bolu – the tiny, crispy-on-the-outside, fluffy sponge cakes traditionally baked in a special mould over a charcoal fire. Bolu koku, on the other hand, has a sponge base but with grated coconut, brandy and spices that fill the kitchen with an amazing fragrance. “Eurasians aren’t just known for making sugee cakes or pang susie,” says Chef D’Silva. “We do a lot of different cakes and kueh such as bolu koku and blueda – which is a Dutch cake that’s like a torte, which uses toddy instead of baking powder to make it rise.” Chef D’Silva is one of the champions of artisanal recipes who will be demonstrating how to make bolu koku at Kueh Appreciation Day (KAD) on July 28 as part of the Singapore Food Festival. Organised by Slow Food Singapore, the annual event started out in 2015 to draw attention ...