Sicily is better known for its red wines, even though they are only about a third of the Mediterranean island’s output. Many a pizza or pasta dinner has been accompanied by Sicily’s inexpensive, ubiquitous red wine Nero d’Avola.  The island hosts a large number of red wine varietals. International varieties include Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah. More interesting are the several dozen, ancient, indigenous red wine grapes, in particular: Nero d’Avola, Nerello Mascalese, Frappato and Perricone Nero d’Avola is Sicily’s best-known red wine grape and, at 18% of vineyard acreage, 34,000 acres, its most widely planted. The grape, grown all over Sicily, is named after the seaside town of Avola in Sicily’s southeast corner in the Syracusa region. Plantings of Nero d’Avola have begun to appear in Australia, and to a lesser extent California, although 98% of all plantings of the varietal are still in Sicily. It reaches its most sophisticated expression, however, in the neighboring province of Ragusa, to the west, where along with Frappato it forms the basis of Sicily’s only DOCG (Denominazione di origine controllata) appellation: Cerasuolo di Victoria. Nero d’Avola, also known as Cal...