The cladding used in the Grenfell Tower renovation has been identified as a cheaper and more flammable variety, amid confusion over whether the material is legal in the UK. The cladding used in the recent renovation of the west London tower was the cheaper of two options offered for the job by manufacturer Omnis, according to The Guardian. The Reynobond PE (polyethylene) panels selected over the Reynobond FR (fire resistant) panels were £2 cheaper per square metre. The aluminium-composite panels, which have a core made of the flammable plastic polyethylene, were installed as part of a recent £8.7 million overhaul of the 24-storey tower near Notting Hill. The cladding was quickly identified as appearing to help to spread the fire – which broke out at 1am last Wednesday, and has killed at least 79 residents. London firm Studio E Architects and contractors Rydon oversaw the refurbishment of the 1970s building, and completed the work last summer. Rydon claims the works met all fire regulations and health and safety standards. But chancellor Philip Hammond has claimed the cladding – which is banned for high-rise buildings in other parts of Europe and America – is illegal in the UK. ...