Shaji Ul Mulk : The ‘Nawab’ of India who once fixed films on windows in UAE, but since accumulated wealth of over $2.7 billion | Uae

Now how many brilliant academic students you know who get admission into prestigious college in the world, only to give it up to pursue a dream of being an entrepreuner? Meet Shaji Ul Mulk, with a personal net-worth of $2.7 billion and whose company – Mulk Holdings enjoys a global annual turnover of $1.8 billion. But this was all possible only because Mulk decided to give up his admission into the prestigious Wharton Business School in University of Pennsylvania way back in 1982. He was 21 and for a young man of that age, he took the risk – well supported by his family – to give up his college admission to pursue a dream of being an entrepreuner. And today he has built an empire. Mulk Holdings is a multinational conglomerate with diversified business interests spanning primarily four sectors – Construction, Renewable Energy, Plastics and Health Care. The parent firm owns and manages a group of 18 companies for more than two decades, spearheaded by Mulk. The organization’s head-quarters are based in Sharjah Hamriya Free zone. Mulk Holdings has won the prestigious MRM Business Excellence Award for the best foreign manufacturer in 2009 from His Highness Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid ...

Grenfell Tower cladding identified as cheaper and more flammable option dezeen-logo dezeen-logo

The cladding used in the Grenfell Tower renovation has been identified as a cheaper and more flammable variety, amid confusion over whether the material is legal in the UK. The cladding used in the recent renovation of the west London tower was the cheaper of two options offered for the job by manufacturer Omnis, according to The Guardian. The Reynobond PE (polyethylene) panels selected over the Reynobond FR (fire resistant) panels were £2 cheaper per square metre. The aluminium-composite panels, which have a core made of the flammable plastic polyethylene, were installed as part of a recent £8.7 million overhaul of the 24-storey tower near Notting Hill. The cladding was quickly identified as appearing to help to spread the fire – which broke out at 1am last Wednesday, and has killed at least 79 residents. London firm Studio E Architects and contractors Rydon oversaw the refurbishment of the 1970s building, and completed the work last summer. Rydon claims the works met all fire regulations and health and safety standards. But chancellor Philip Hammond has claimed the cladding – which is banned for high-rise buildings in other parts of Europe and America – is illegal in the UK. ...