Editor’s note: Fifty years ago Saturday, Hurricane Camille, the second-most intense hurricane to make landfall in the United States, slammed the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Here’s a look at that storm.  It was hot in the summer of 1969, in just about every way it could be – politically, culturally and, by the middle of August, it was just plain hot when you walked outside your door. While discord was brewing in parts of the U.S., what was brewing off the coast of Africa would blossom into an event that would decimate an entire region and lead to a new way to classify one of nature’s most devastating forces. Hurricane Camille, which began life as an area of disturbed weather that drifted off the African savanna, would trek west across the Atlantic which in early August 1969 was sporting near perfect conditions to create a monster storm. When the hurricane made landfall near midnight on Aug. 17, 1969, it would do so with screaming winds, sheets of rain and a wall of water more than two stories high. As the weather system that would become Camille moved into the Atlantic on Aug. 5, conditions near the Cape Verde Islands didn’t seem to support the formation of a tropical cyclone. Dry Sa...